Brand Promise Comes To Life In Perfect Promotional Product


Pril Dishwashing Liquid has a longstanding promise that “One drop of Pril is powerful enough to wash a set of dishes.” But don’t think the company is being flippant with the one-drop claim. They have the research data to prove it.

And now they’re asking consumers to put it to the test. In a new campaign designed by Dubai-based TBWA\RAAD for the company’s Middle East markets, Pril reiterates the single-drop claim by showing off a packaging miracle—the single-drop bottle.

It’s an exact replica, including identical branding, of the full-size Pril bottle reduced down to the size of a fingernail.

TBWA told Adweek that Pril’s competitors have begun making their own single-drop claims, so the company felt the need to reassert the brand statement in a way that “customers can actually feel with their own hands.” While there was no mass-scale production of the bottle, there are samples to be had for lucky shoppers in participating supermarkets.

All photos courtesy of TrendHunter

It may be a tiny bottle, but it’s a little piece of promotional perfection. Such a simple concept, smartly executed. Further proof that great promotional campaigns don’t have to be big to make a lasting impression. We just wish they included the U.S. in the campaign so we could get our hands on one of those bottles.

Where Should You Sell Your Laser Cut Products? Maker’s Markets vs Online Selling

Custom-made items are steadily gaining popularity. But you probably already know that by now. If you’ve ever thought about selling your laser cut products, now is the best time to do it. There are a lot of channels you can try for testing the waters of selling your products. The two main channels are online selling and selling in a physical location.

Online makes it easy to expand distribution and sell products. Even in this space, there are several channels to choose from. As a maker, you can set up your own store. Buying your own domain, getting hosting and putting your site together is relatively easy if you have some coding skills. If not, you can always buy turnkey solutions or get easy-to-setup sites like WordPress or Shopify. There are also DIY-friendly retail sites such as Etsy which have made it easier for artisans, woodworkers or metalworkers to sell online.

Then, there are maker community conferences usually called Maker’s Markets or Maker Faires. The first Maker Faire started in San Francisco and New York but are now becoming more commonplace across the globe. These events are also drawing in crowds by the thousands. According to Make magazine, the attendance of about 74,000 in 2009 grew to 120,000 in 2013.

So how do you choose one over the other?

It really depends on your skills and your comfort level as a seller. Skill-wise, selling online requires a bit of technical knowledge. If understanding terms like html, hosting and FTP seem out of your league, then start with face-to-face selling via a Maker’s Market. On the opposite end of the spectrum, if you are uncomfortable chatting up with potential buyers or pushing to close the sale, then an online channel might be your best bet.

There are also several benefits to consider. Online selling means less overhead cost. There is no need to rent out a both or set up your physical store, pay for utilities or hire people to maintain your retail space. Another important advantage of online is selling is the wider reach. Over 1 billion people worldwide use the internet today, reaching them is a matter of knowing how to market your products online. Analytics software also makes it easy to measure the results of any activity you do and attribute success to the right campaign.

Selling in a physical store, on the other hand, gives you the opportunity to talk directly to your target market. You can easily find out their feedback and take note of improvements you need to make without conducting complicated surveys or focus group discussions. As a maker, you also get instant gratification when you hear good reviews about your work and can be quite exhilarating and inspiring.

That’s our take on both selling channels for makers. Have you tried selling your products online and in Maker’s Markets? Tell us about your experience in the comments below.

Cashing in on the Wedding Industry: Laser Cut Invitations

How Etsy sellers are finding success with Laser Cut Invitations

etsy wedding laser cut lovepop

Every year, around 2.5 million weddings are celebrated in the US. Chances are, the guests who attend these weddings are not being invited via text message! The traditional paper invitation continues to be the chosen method for soon-to-be nuptials.

But that does not mean they are limited to plain old (or even fancy) printing. Clever designers have been using laser cutting to create novel wedding invitations, and then turning a tidy profit thanks to the thriving marketplace for all things Wedding on Etsy.

Why use laser cutting for wedding invitations?

Familiar graphic themes from traditional wedding invitations can be reinterpreted using laser cutting with Ponoko’s Personal Factory. The delicate forms of lace and filigree patterns, floral motifs and artistic whimsies are no sweat for a laser cutter. Even better, laser cut details on wedding invitations allow for layered effects, overlays with color reveals and hints of further artwork or information within folded content.

Laser cut invitation examples

The wedding invitation is an opportunity for couples to introduce their guests to the flavor of their upcoming celebrations. Let’s take a look at a few examples that have been made available by designers selling their laser cut invitations on Etsy.


For a more traditional approach, the floral lace effect of this invitation cover (above, left) by Dorothy Rovensky hints at the fine papercraft of past elegance while introducing a contemporary feel. Extending on this theme, the modern illustrated artwork using laser cut negative space as a decorative frame (above, right) by Lavish Laser demonstrates another approach, where the cardstock containing ornate printed text is laser cut as a secondary process.


Setting the scene for a romantic wedding, the Laser Cut Love Story (above, left) by Celine Designs captures a moment of romance in an intimate silhouette.  The multiple folds of DotLaser’s invitation (above, center) uses silhouettes of a country wedding scene to help set the tone for an upcoming ceremony. Also envoking the special moment in silhouette (above, right) is this example from madebyloveaustralia, where additional color highlights the laser cut artwork.


Laser cut invitation covers are a popular way to add elegance without departing from the traditional printed invitation nestled inside. The double floral folds from Stunning Stationery (above, left) and single fold from Cartalia (above, center) let the recipient know there is something special inside, as does another example with a modern leaf pattern (above, right) also from Cartalia.


Designers and artists familiar with laser cutting also love to cut and etch into wood. These two examples from Aniri Art (above) add a playful twist with the recognisable visual hallmarks of laser cut ply.

Another technique used by successful wedding invitation designers on Etsy is to create 3D effects from slotted laser cut assemblies. We can see this technique represented very nicely with the Willow Tree Love Scene popup card from LovePopCards, featured at the top of this post.

Weddings are a time where happy couples specifically set out to make an impact as they share their big day with friends and family. As we can see from the collection of samples available for sale on Etsy, designers are catching on that laser cutting is a clever way to contribute to this growing industry. Can you think of interesting ways to incorporate laser cutting into your wedding invitation designs? Let us know how you’ll make laser cut romance in the comments below.

Spend $50 or More at Ponoko, Get a FREE $50 Making Voucher

An Independence Day Deal For The Independent Designer

Independence Day Promo - Laser Cutting Promo

The independent designer’s favorite deal is back! This summer, let’s celebrate Independence Day with a FREE $50 making voucher.  

To Get Your $50 Making Voucher:

  1. Log in to your Ponoko account. If you don’t have one, sign up for free here.
  2. Place a $50 minimum order at the Ponoko US or NZ hub.
  3. Type ‘JULY16’ in the coupon box while checking out, and we’ll email your $50 Making Voucher.

Things You Should Know:

Offer good for making stuff with laser cutting at Ponoko. Showroom or sample store purchases do not qualify. $50 minimum does not include shipping. Other coupon codes or vouchers cannot be used with this offer. Offer good at Ponoko US and NZ only. Offer also valid for Ponoko Prime accounts. Offer starts 8:00am Pacific Time on June 4, 2016 and ends at 11:59pm Pacific Time on July 4, 2016.

About The Free Making Voucher:

Promotional voucher redeemable until Sept 4th, 2016. Promotional making voucher is good for a future laser cutting order, not the initial $50 order. One promotional voucher per account. (Making Vouchers are good on making costs only.)

Forget Boring: Cosplay Goes Custom With VIP Event Badges


Name badges are essential to any event. And because of the number of attendees and logistical needs for being able to print badges on site, most conventions opt for paper badges slipped into plastic sleeves. Functional, of course. Yet, unfortunately, boring.

But boring isn’t really an option for the creatives behind the Cosplay America convention, an annual event that debuted in 2014 to bring together all levels of Cosplayers to form a community that shares and celebrates the art and craft of Cosplay.

Cosplay, the combination of “costume” and “play,” gives fans of anime, comics, manga, movies, television and video games an opportunity to dress as their favorite characters and celebrate the creativity within the genre. When this group gets together each year, it’s anything but boring.

The Challenge

“I was looking into something more we could do for our VIP guests,” explains Iris Chen, art director and designer for Cosplay America. “I wanted an item that was unique to the event and small enough to have during the event—all while being a nice takeaway gift for afterward.”

Since the Cosplay America Convention encourages and promotes the DIY attitude of Cosplayers, the tradeshow giveaway had to be interesting enough to appeal to this group of talented people from around the world.

“This lead to us experimenting on how we could do badges a better way for upper-level staff and VIP guests,” Chen says.

The Result

Chen says she was given free reign on the project and didn’t have any specific criteria in mind when she began. But she did have previous experience with laser cut badges and liked the results.


She chose a vertical design to showcase the badges three main elements: the Cosplay America logotype, its circular graphic logo, and the recipients name and title. To add interest, the logo and the attendee name are cut through the acrylic with the other details etched into the material. Rounded edges were included for functional reasons (as to not get caught on fabric) and because they provide a more finished, polished look. Finally, the gold mirrored surface added just the right amount of bling to be noticed without detracting from any costumes.

While Chen notes that she is familiar with Ponoko and the process after making some signage and small gift items personally in the past, she says the service is simple to use as a novice. “It’s easy and efficient,” she says. “I have enjoyed seeing everything that has come out and everyone is extremely impressed.”

Ideas for Creative Agencies & Brands – #40

Laser Cutting for Memorial Day

laser cut and etched american flag

Taking a moment to step back and honor the fallen on Memorial Day brings US citizens together on the last Monday in May each year. Amongst the paraphernalia that goes along with this sombre event, perhaps none is more powerful than the American Flag. The iconic Stars and Stripes make a bold statement that is instantly recognised across the globe, and the clean graphic composition of the flag lends itself well to visual reproductions using laser cutting.

Sharing in a show of National pride can take many forms, and through laser cutting we are able to add creative and eye-catching mementos to the Memorial Day caché.

Laser Cut Flag Stencils

memorial day laser cut flag stencil

Pictured above, the READYMAN American Flag Card is a no-nonsense, seriously tough keepsake made from 301 stainless steel. It can be used as a tracing template or as a decorative object in its own right. Continuing on the theme of using laser cutting to create an American Flag stencil, there are numerous clip-art options available for free online. We thought this dynamic flag-in-motion (below, left) captures the mood well. Another approach from Hollywood Toys & Costumes (below, right) is to make three stencils, one for each color of the red, white and blue.

memorial day laser cut flag stencils


Laser Cut Ornaments


While The Laser Place has a neat hanging ornament featuring the US Flag (above, left) on their Etsy store, amongst their other products you can find mementos of different branches of the armed forces. Laser etched cork coasters (above, middle) provide an example of how iconic Service emblems and badges can be incorporated into your celebrations. Also from The Laser Place, the laser cut wall plaque (above, right) is a more permament fixture that has been laser cut and etched with a layered 3D effect.

What other Memorial Day mementos can be customised for your clients using the Ponoko Personal Factory? Let us know in the comments below. For more ideas for Agencies and Brands, see the other posts in the series.

3 New Materials To Inspire New Projects: Peel & Stick Veneers

Sticker Products

Need something new to inspire your next laser cut wood project? Can’t find the right material that offers flexibility and versatility? Check out our latest additions to our material selection. The wood design on these peel & stick veneers offer incredible detail.

The premium grade real wood veneer has a pressure sensitive adhesive backing. The veneer is quite flexible along the grain and can be applied to curved surfaces. They’re great for jewelry projects, to stick on to acrylics or to create amazing 3D stickers. Your imagination is the only limit to you how you can use the walnut, bamboo amber and bamboo blonde peel & stick veneers for your next laser cut wood project.

Click on the images below to get all the details on our new premium peel & stick veneers.

Peel & Stick Veneer – Walnut

Walnut has rich, chocolate hues, auburn undertones, and beautiful grain patterns that make it appealing as material for projects that need stronger color contrast.

laser cut wood veneer

Peel & Stick Veneer – Bamboo Amber

Bamboo has a beautiful fine grain which may have some visible joints on the surface to break up the grain — giving it a unique appearance. The Amber version has a  golden brown color, a great choice for neutral-looking jewelry projects.

laser cut wood veneer - bamboo amber

Peel & Stick Veneer – Bamboo Blonde

The natural occurence of joints on this other new bamboo is also a welcome break from the fine grain. It has a golden color that is a few shades lighter than the Amber version.

laser cut wood veneer - bamboo blonde



We’d love to know your ideas for things you can make with these new materials. Comment them below.

Tools For Enhancing Your Laser Cut Product Photos

If you’re trying to sell your laser cut products online for the first time, there are a few things you need to know. Factors like having the right content for your product description and having amazing pictures can greatly influence your success as an online seller. Whether you choose to sell your products on Etsy, in your own store or any other online seller, it is important to remember that your potential buyers only have images and words to rely on. If you’ve made your laser cut prototype with Ponoko, you’re already on the right path. Having that physical product (or at least a photo of it)  to show your potential buyers is a must-have.

So, let’s get started with getting your product photos to look stunning. After all, they say pictures paint a thousand words. These tools — both free and paid — can help you highlight your products:

  1. PicMonkey – This free browser-based tool can do a lot of things — it makes it super easy to add filters, effects, text and do some awesome overlays. One of the more useful features for product photos is collage, which you can use for showing different angles of the same product in one frame.PicMonkey - Laser Cut Product Photo Editing
  2. FotoFuze – Clean up the background of your image and set it against either black or white. This way, the focus is on your product and nothing else. Plus, an all-white product makes it look more professional. FotoFuze - Laser Cut Product Photo Editing
  3. FotoFlexer – Another free tool you can use by uploading images to the web where you can easily retouch photos or add effects. Aside from the usual choices such as posterize, grayscale or sepia, you can also use lomo, comic, patchwork and more. FotoFlexer - Laser Cut Product Photo Editing
  4. Fotor – It’s cheap at $39 per year and you can use it directly on your browse. You can also try it for free if you’re not sure you want to pay an image editing tool just yet. It has some pretty amazing features such as the High Dynamic Range (HDR) tech which brings out the true colors of your photos. The HDR tech also lets you combine photos with different exposures into one cool image.
  5. Pixlr – This is a popular tool that can be used on the web, as an app or downloaded on a computer. It can be used to work in layers, transform objects, add overlays, borders and more.
  6. GIMP – The GNU Image Manipulation Program or GIMP is the free equivalent of Photoshop. While it doesn’t quite have all the bells and whistles as Photoshop, it’s good enough to help you with basic image clean-up. This needs to be downloaded to your computer.
  7. Photoshop Express – Who doesn’t love Photoshop? If you do but can’t really afford the license, get the next best thing: a free app! If you’re shooting your product photos with your phone, this can help crop, fix red-eye, reduce noise and more.

There you have it! A short but sweet list of free/nearly-free/you-gotta-pay tools to help you come up with professional or fun-looking photos for your laser cut items.

Modernizing Vintage Crafts With Laser Cutting

There is a certain beauty to vintage crafts.

One of the hard-to-beat old-fashioned crafting techniques is paper tole. This is the art of constructing three-dimensional images by cutting and layering elements from identical images. So essentially, you are building a 3D image using 2D prints. This style is also known as papier tole and 3D decoupage.

The simplest types of paper toles are those you’d see in pop-up books or old 3D cards. Even with just two layers, it seems to bring out an entire magical dimension to the paper craft. The more popular use of this technique is to produce a decorative framed print where the image is set in a deep wall frame and the finished product is displayed as wall art.

Vintage Paper Tole Card

The exact origin of paper toles is unknown. Traces of the art can be seen in Italian furniture in the 16th century where cut and shaped paper was shellacked to furniture. The same was used in 17th century France, where furniture craftsmen used varnish to protect the delicate paper cut designs. It has evolved into an artform called “Vue d’Optique” where paper sculptures are used to create three-dimensional pictures. The craft as we know it today, further emerged during the Depression-era USA. In the 1930’s it was common for households to receive multiple Christmas cards sold by charity agencies and contain the same image. Innovative crafters used these cards to create what is the current art form. The craft really surged in popularity in the late 70’s to the early 80’s.

Much of the focus of paper toles was on the artistry — layers were lovingly and skillfully hand-cut to create depth, contour and perception. However, since it consumes time and the complexity of the process requires a degree of skill, it has become a dying art.

Modernizing Paper Tole with Laser Crafting


This is where laser cutting can save the day! It can revive the nearly-lost art of paper toles by taking out the excruciating part of the process — the cutting. Now before you think that this simply destroys the art — hold that thought! There’s much more to paper tole than just cutting. This is the very reason why paper tole kits began populating the market in the 1980’s. Pre-cut kits became available to those who love the assembly process but do not have time for the cutting process.

Modern-day paper tole with laser cutting

Essentially the process is the same as in the traditional way it is done. When designing a laser-cut paper tole kit, the maker needs to look at the 2-dimensional image and visualize a foreground, a middle-ground and a background. It’s not really the cutting that makes it special, but rather the shaping. Sculpting each cut-out piece gives the entire picture a natural perspective and a touch of realism.

A maker can focus on just producing a paper tole kit instead of an entire project. The kit, in itself, is a sellable item that many will still appreciate. Once the pieces are pre-cut and pre-sculpted using precision laser cutting, assembly instructions are needed to produce the complete kit. A laser-cut paper tole kit will resonate well with an audience who wants to focus on the layering or assembly part of the paper tole technique. They can layer and glue the pieces to the provided base print with a neutral cure silicone to create the 3D effect.

Another option for makers would be to create the completed paper tole artwork and sell it as is. There’s still a growing market for precision-crafted art and laser cutting makes the space all the more exciting to explore.

How To Make a Laser Cut Wobbler

Get your creativity rolling with this simple DIY laser cut project

laser cut wobbler 1

Watching things wobble has something mysterious and mesmerising about it, and when you add in the precision of a laser cutter, the results are mathematically sublime. Building your own laser cut Wobbler is a fun way to learn about the physics behind motion and inertia, or if the how and why is not as critical for you as the what, perhaps having something novel and intriguing to roll across the table is reason enough!

Thanks to Thingiverse users Greg Zumwalt and Ella Jameson, making your own laser cut Wobbler is easier than ever. You may notice from the image above (and the video below) that Greg’s design is not actually laser cut… it has been 3D printed. That’s where Ella comes in – she remixed Greg’s design to make her laser cut version, and shared the files for others to enjoy.

Simply download Ella’s .svg files (different disk sizes have been prepared for a material thickness of 3mm) and fire up your Ponoko Personal Factory to laser cut in your 3mm material of choice.

Here is a video of Greg’s wobbler in action:

So how does a Wobbler work?

The Wobbler moves so nicely because its center of gravity remains very nearly constant while rolling along, thanks to the ratio between the slots that connect the disks and their radii. This can be calculated for any round-ish shape using mathematical magic, but if equations make you wobbly, then you can cheat a little and use the approximated ratio of:

Slot Length = Disk Radius * 0.293

Wobblers can come in a number of forms, and with the repeated motion of the disks as they roll along, there is a great opportunity to laser etch onto the surfaces for further visual impact. It is also possible to apply the same mathematics to other Wobbler constructions; perhaps the most notable example of this is John Edmark’s laser cut Rollipses.

Click through for a video of yet another stunning kinetic mathematical wonder from John Edmark, as well as a collection of Wobblers presented by Tim at Grand Illusions. (more…)