The Kyub MIDI keyboard hits Kickstarter

The Kyub offers a six-sided twist on the usual 2D keyboard

Meet the Kyub, a compact, fully programmable MIDI interface that provides a new way to compose, record and perform music.

The Kyub features 11 fully programmable feather-touch keypads that connect to any computer or synthesizer via USB. Inside, an accelerometer tracks the movement of the Kyub to control the volume of the notes played.

These features make the interface really responsive, however the truly amazing thing is the way the Kyub is played. Check out the Kickstarter video below to see the Kyub in action:

The Kyub is designed as a kit that can be assembled at home by just about anyone, using laser cut parts from Ponoko.

If you’re short on soldering skills, you can back the Kyub and get a fully assembled unit as a reward. The Kyub is made to be as open and maker-friendly as possible, any computer-based synthesizer can be used to work with the Kyub.

If all this has got you excited for some cubed-out synth action, head over to the Kyub Kickstarter page to support the project and help make the Kyub a reality.

MicroSlice laser cutter now on Kickstarter

mini Arduino laser cutter & engraver kits

There was plenty of excited chatter when Greg Holloway posted his MicroSlice laser cutter on Instructables last year. Much of this involved people asking “where, when and how can I get one?” Well, the good news is that this diminutive digital manufacturing device is now the subject of a Kickstarter campaign, and the pledges are coming in fast.

The MicroSlice is a nifty little unit. Once you take a closer look, it is easy to see why it won the 2013 Instructables Radioshack Microcontroller Contest. Imagine a laser cutter that sits on your desktop. Not impressed? Consider that it sits on your desktop, and takes up less space than a bowl of cereal. Less space than a takeout container. Less space than a burger with the lot. In fact it takes up less space than the power supply from a regular sized laser cutter.

The MicroSlice is a Build-It-Yourself kit, uses Open Source Software, and can be easily assembled at home by just about anyone.

The MicroSlice can cut paper, and engrave wood & plastic. Kits include an Arduino UNO R3 as well as 97 laser-cut parts and all necessary hardware to get up and running. The laser diode is a 100mw red laser, similar to what you’d find inside a DVD-RW drive. An option is available to supercharge the MicroSlice with a 200mw laser.

With a truly miniature work area of 50mm x 50mm (2″ x 2″) users will be choosing their projects carefully.  For bigger projects, there is always Ponoko.

Learn more, watch videos of the MicroSlice in action, and make a pledge over at Kickstarter.

MicroSlice on Kickstarter

Ponoko unboxing of lasercut Kickstarter rewards

Ponoko-made project by Garland West

Ever wondered what it’s like to get a shipment from Ponoko? The video shows Garland West, an artist/crafter outside of Charlotte NC, unboxing her recent lasercut order featuring a variety of materials and sheet sizes.

You can see her peeling the protective paper and popping out her designs including bamboo business cards, acrylic jewelry, and a big red octopus.

“A lot of the items you see in the unboxing video are pledge rewards for my Kickstarter project,” she says.

“I made thank you cards from cardstock, yoga pose jewelry from bamboo, and coasters out of cork.” And the octopus? “Oh, that’s not a reward. It’s a ‘clocktopus’ project I’m working on.”

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3D Systems sues the maker of the Form 1 3D printer and Kickstarter for patent infringement

What will this mean for low cost 3D printers and crowdsourcing?

Formlabs, maker of the Form 1 3D printer that was a runaway hit on Kickstarter, is being sued for patent infringement by 3D systems. 3D systems is also suing Kickstarter for promoting the project on the grounds that Kickstarter had a financial stake since they take a 5% cut.

The Form 1 raised $2,945,885, a remarkable feat, because it offered low-cost stereolithography printing. Other low-cost printers like the MakerBot and RepRep use a plastic extrusion technique, but the Form 1 uses UV cure resin, allowing for much higher resolution prints.

This brings us to the main issue. 3D Systems has an extensive patent on the use of stereolithography for 3D printing, and they are claiming that Form Labs violated it. Specifically, 3D systems is claiming that Form Labs infringed claim 1 and 34 of U.S. Patent No. 5,597,520.

This will be a case to watch. Regardless of the outcome, it could have a large impact on the future of low cost 3D printing and crowdsourcing.

Via Tech Crunch

Joshua Harker’s 3D printed sculpture explodes on Kickstarter (again!)

Yeah… I want one.

Anatomica di Revolutis

Joshua Harker, an artist who took up 3D printing to push beyond the limits of sculpting, took Kickstarter by storm last year with his Crania Anatomica Filigre skull design.

Now he’s back, with a new project called Anatomica di Revolutis that builds on the aesthetics of his previous work and takes it to new heights.

Harker’s first Kickstarter project raised nearly $80,000, while this latest one has over $20,000 in less than a week of funding. (In fact, the $20k mark was reached in just four days!)

The project starts with an ornate skull design at the center, which combines with two other pieces to form an elaborate mechanical sculpture: (more…)

Form 1 3D printer reaches almost $3M on Kickstarter

The low cost stereolithography 3D printer reached almost 30x its funding goal and broke the Kickstarter record.

The Kickstarter campaign for the Form 1 stereolithography 3D printer beat all expectations and then some. It ended with $2,945,885 in funding, almost 30x the goal of $100,000. It had $1M in funding in the first day, and before the end it broke the Kickstarter record formerly held be the Oculus Rift of $2.4M.

What make the Form 1 special is that it is the first laser-based 3D printer available at an affordable price. While most stereolithography printers cost tens or hundreds of thousands, the Form 1 was offered for as little as $2299 for the first 25. It is aimed at (and price for) the professional market, but this price is still shockingly low compared to equivalent printers currently on the market.

Read more about the printer in our earlier post announcing the beginning of the Kickstarter campaign.

Via WebProNews

MilliMount smartphone mount prototyped with Ponoko, launches Kickstarter campaign

Unexpected uses expected

MilliMount

MilliMount, an expandable smartphone mount that recently launched on Kickstarter, was prototyped early on using Ponoko’s 3D printing service.

If funding is successful, the combination phone stand/tripod mount/windshield mount will be manufactured through traditional means. But during development, Spatial Studios used one of the great strengths of 3D printing: iteration. That enabled creator Randy Ganacias to make changes over and over until the design was declared finished.

Scanning documents

What’s neat is that although many use cases have been planned for (such as book scanner, above), it’s the unplanned ones that are most intriguing. The MilliMount has space to accommodate metal rings, elastic bands, and bolts… All in service of connecting up whatever odd thing you can think of.

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PandaBot 3D printer launches on Kickstarter

Friendly and disruptive

PandaBot 3D printer

The PandaBot 3D printer launched on Kickstarter earlier this morning, coming in an initial backer price of USD$800. Panda Robotics, the company behind the PandaBot, hopes to entice new users by providing friendly software and sturdy, attractive metal construction not normally seen at that price point.

I visited the Toronto office of Panda Robotics yesterday to have a look at the prototype unit and see some test prints. I’ve taken part in some events with Panda in the past, but I’d never really had time to sit down and watch their printer in action.

Here’s a comparison shot of how the resolution of the prototype’s prints has improved over time: (more…)

Electro-luminescent prayer mat glows when facing Mecca, a Kickstarter project

bringing the El Sajjadah to production

The El Sajjadah is an illuminating prayer mat by product design studio SOPDS. Using a built-in digital compass and user input of current location, the mat detects the direction of Mecca and lights up when properly oriented. The glowing pattern depicts the story of life and indicates a place for the feet and hands during prayer.

This innovative combination of technology and religion has received international attention ranging from a cover story in the UK’s T3 magazine to the International Inventor’s Fair in Kuwait to a recent exhibition and acquisition by the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Encouraged by the global interest in the El Sajjadah, SOPDS members Soner, Bahadir, Ben, and Cat have launched a Kickstarter project to put his prayer mat into production and make it available to the 1.6 million+ Muslims around the world.

Rewards for project backers include both an A3 and full scale size prints, an actual El Sajjadah from the first production run, a customized version from our UK lasercutting partner RazorLAB, and the opportunity to work with designer Soner Ozenc on a completely custom electro-luminescent prayer mat.

Check out this Kickstarter video to learn more about the project and see the mat in action.

TJ* the animatronic puppet on Kickstarter

An Arduino-controlled puppet with moving eyes and mouth.

Jeff Kessler originally made TJ* to use in a short movie he was making before deciding to develop it for the public. TJ* is an animatronic puppet head with eyes the move up, down, left, and right as well as a moving mouth.

It is intended as both a toy for children that they can continue to improve as they grow up and as a development platform for makers and artists.

The complete system is still available for pre-order on Kickstarter for $120, but if already have an Arduino you can pre-order just the head and servo motors for $50.

Via designboom